Mikedowney.co.uk
What's New
Site Map

Diary
Astronomy
Bits N Bobs
Computing
Food And Drink
Links
Photography
Welcome


Recipe Collections
Recipe A Week 2013
Recipe A Week 2010
A-Z of Regional Cakes
Alphabet of Nations


Selected Entries
Pinhole Photography
Keeping Quail
Coventry
Recipes
A different recipe each week
Friends websites
Oven Temperatures and Measuring Cups


Most popular stories
A Hamster's Home is his C...
Hamster Peanuts
Simple HDR photography wi...
A Tangfastic Mess
Halloween Animal Beds
Decaffeinated Coffee
Garden Fountain
Pizza, Hamsters and Ballo...
Hamster Baby Update
More Squirrel Photos
Not Quite HDR photography


RSS Feeds:
RSS Feed Entire Site.
RSS Feed Diary only.



Powered by Blosxom


Pinhole Photography Ring
pinhole webring logo
powered by RingSurf
Next | Previous
Random Site | List Sites

Pinhole Photography Day

Story location: Home / photography / pinhole /
27/Apr/2015

It's been quite a long time since I posted any non-food photos (back in September when I dabbled with some HDR images), and I haven't done any pinhole photography since 2008.

Yesterday was Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day so I decided to have another go, this time in colour and digital (most of my previous pinhole work was medium format on black and white film). I made a pinhole 'lens' by drilling a hole in a body cap and taping some foil over the hole. I made a hole in the foil using the thinnest needle I could find.

I did a few test photos indoors before going out for a walk along the canal. Since I didn't take my tripod with me, I set the camera to maximum sensitivity to keep the exposures short. Most of the outdoors shots were between 0.5-2s so I still had to brace the camera against something solid but they came out ok.

 

Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail
Thumbnail

Click on the thumbnail to view the image



Regional Cakeathon Q: Quebec Maple Tart

Story location: Home / food_and_drink / a_to_z /
12/Apr/2015

I have had to go a bit further afield for the letter Q. When I was trying to find a British recipe, the nearest I could find was something called a Summer Pudding Of The Quantocks. The source of this recipe appears to be a single website which no longer exists so I decided to find something else.

There is a traditional Canadian recipe called a sugar pie and there are maple syrup versions from the Quebec region.

The recipe I followed was based on the one here but with the quantities halved:

  • ½ a cup of demerara sugar
  • 1/8 cup of maple syrup
  • 200ml of double cream
  • 1/8 cup of plain flour

I whisked together the first 3 ingredients then sifted the flour and whisked it into the mixture. I made my usual shortcrust pastry recipe, following the one on the BBC website (4oz plain flour, 2oz butter, a pinch of salt and enough water to bring it together).

The base was baked blind then the filling was poured in and returned to the oven, at gas mark 4, and baked until it was bubbling on top and started to look brown.

Quebec Maple Tart

The tart was very good but could probably do with more maple flavour. If I try it again I might up the maple syrup content and slightly reduce the sugar. Alternatively I might follow a traditional English treacle tart recipe but use maple syrup to replace some of the golden syrup.



Regional Cakeathon P: Penzance Cakes

Story location: Home / food_and_drink / a_to_z /
06/Apr/2015

This recipe came from The Country Housewife and Lady's Director', written by R. Bradley (who was Professor of Botany at Cambridge University) and published in 1728.

The Country Housewife and Lady's Director' (Bradley 1728)

The 'same' in the recipe above refers to a Mrs. M.N. who provided several recipes for the book.

Take the Yolks of Eggs well beaten, put to them some Mace finely powder'd, with a few spoonfuls of Wine, a little Salt, and as much Sugar as you please; then add as much Flour as is necessary, and a small quantity of Ale-Yeast, and work your Dough pretty stiff; then add some fresh Butter, broken in little bits, and work it in till all the Paste has partaken of it, and the Dough becomes as stiff as at first. Make your Cakes then, and bake them. They will keep some time.

See more ....
I was unable to find out anything of the history of the Penzance Cake or whether it was traditionally associated with an event or festival. I found one website (Three Hearth House - Chi Teyr Oles, Simple living in West Cornwall) which discussed the Harvest Festival but didn't give any concrete history.

I decided to make two versions of the cake, with and without currants (or more precisely sultanas), so some would be close to the original book recipe and some would be more like the version from the website above (which didn't actually give the recipe they used).

The original recipe was wonderfully vague, as was the fashion at the time, failing to mention any quantities or times. It didn't even mention any need to prove the dough but I took that as an oversight and left mine to rise.

My recipe:

  • 1 medium egg, beaten
  • 2 tbs wine, infused overnight with 2 cloves and a pinch of nutmeg.
  • ¼tsp each of ginger and mixed spice
  • a pinch of salt
  • 2tbs sugar
  • 2 cups of flour (a mixture of plain and wholemeal)
  • 1 tsp bread yeast
  • 40g butter
  • 2 tbs sultanas

Since I don't have any mace, I steeped some nutmeg and a few cloves in the wine first. I also added ginger and mixed spice to the cake. I mixed everything in the order given in Bradley, adding ¾ of the flour initially, mixing more in while I kneaded in the butter. I divided the dough into two and kneaded sultanas into one half and left the other half plain. I shaped the dough into bread rolls and left them to rise for a few hours.

Penzance Cakes

The dough was quite dense and took a long time to rise. I baked them at gas mark 4 for about half an hour or so, until they looked done. The taste and texture was similar to a hot cross bun.

Penzance Cakes